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MUSEUM NASIONAL
Indonesia National Museum

The Museum National is located on the side of Merdeka Square or Lapangan Merdeka and was built in 1862 at that time Dutch colonial administration realized about the great treasure of Indonesian cultural heritages and long history of Indonesia. The biggest surprised for the Western historians was the fact that historical record in Indonesia showing tremendous level of similarities with those in India, India and Asia mainland in general. The elements of India is the most interesting aspect at one side and the fact of Indonesian ethnography. All these facts had invited various experts to study Indonesia in more intensive and extensive effort. In the field of history the archaeologists, paleontologists, epigraphists, linguistic, paleographic and ceramologists have dedicated themselves for the light of Indonesian history, educated local student to understand their culture which had been a great historians such as Prof. Dr. Poerbatjaraka, Prof. Wiryosuparto, Prof Soekarto, Prof. Soekmono, Prof. I.B. Mantra and many others. In the field of Anthropology even more expert were born, although it is much later such as Prof. Koentjaraningrat.

Deeper study on Hindu tradition has brought into light the eat influence of Indian Epic such as Mahabharata and Ramayana in the life of Javanese and Balinese. Everywhere in the region of Indonesia were found the remains of ancient Hindu kingdoms and culture. The remains either in thee form of monuments and artifacts. This fact has encouraged the establishment of national museum as the center for Indonesian cultural study.

As a national museum, their collection consist of ethnic map, Indonesian relief map, various ethnic cultural objects from cloths, music, house model, and relics. In the field of history, a big number of collection from ancient Hindu kingdoms, and Chinese ceramic from Hand dynasty ( ca. 300 to 220 AD).

History Of National Museum
On April 24, 1778, a group of Dutch intellectuals established a scientific institution under the name Bataviaasch Genotschap van Kunsten en Wetenschappen, (Batavia Society for Arts and Science). This private body had the aim of promoting research in the field of arts and sciences, especially in history, archaeology, ethnography and physics, and publish the various findings.
One of the founders - JCM Radermacher - donated building and a collection of cultural objects and books, which were of great value to start off a museum and library for the society. Due to the growing collections, General Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles built a new premises on Jalan Majapahit No. 3 at the beginning of the 19th century and named it the Literary Society. In the 1862 the Dutch East Indian government decided to build a new museum that would not only serve as an office but also could be used to house, preserve and display the collections.
The Museum was officially opened in 1868 and became known as Gedung Gajah (Elephant House) or Gedung Arca (House of Statues). It was called Gedung Gajah on account of the bronze elephant statue in the front yard donated by King Chulalongkorn from Thailand in 1871. It was also called Gedung Arca because a great variety of statues from different periods are on display in the house.
On February 29, 1950 the Institution became the Lembaga Kebudayaan Indonesia (Indonesian Culture Council) and on September 17, 1962 it was handed over to the Indonesian government and became the Museum Pusat (Central Museum). By decree of the Minister of Education and Culture No. 092/0/1979 of May 28, 1979 it was renamed the Museum Nasional. The Museum Nasional is not only a centre for research and study into the national and cultural heritage, but also functions as an educative, cultural and recreational information centre.
Currently the Museum Nasional houses collections of 109,342 objects under the categories of prehistory, archaeology, ethnography, numismatics-heraldic, geography and historical relics.
In 1994, the museum started with is expansion project. The new building, constructed in the same architectural style as the old, comprises an arena for theatrical performances and more spaces for exhibitions. The building is scheduled for completion this year.

General Information
Opening Times
The Museum Nasional is open from 8.30 am to 2.30 pm on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Sunday; from 8.30 am to 11.30 am on Friday; and from 8.30 am to 1.30 pm on Saturday.
The Museum is closed on Monday.
Admission Fee
Adults - Rp750
Children under 17 years and students - Rp250
Gift shop
A small gift shop located in the entrance hall has the same opening hours as the rest of The Museum. It offers a selection of books, postcards and reproductions of various exhibits.
Parking
The Museum is situated on jalan Merdeka Barat. The front courtyard can accommodate cars and tour buses.
Tours
The Indonesian Heritage Society conducts tours of the Museum at the following times
English: Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday 9.30 am & LAST SUNDAY of every month at 10.30 am
Japanese: Tuesday 10 am and FIRST SUNDAY of every month at 10 am
German: Thursday 10 am
The times and dates of guided tours in Dutch and French can be obtained by telephoning the Indonesian Heritage Society Office at Museum Nasional on (62-21) 381 1551 extension 46
Visitors are kindly asked to refrain from smoking, eating and drinking in all areas of the Museum, and are prohibited from touching the exhibits.

COLLECTION
Prehistory
The Prehistoric Age has long time frame, beginning from the presence of man until the emergence of writing differs in every part of the world. From the discovery of ancient human fossils in Indonesia, it is estimated that man lived here around one million years ago. Writing emerged before the 4th century.
Paleontology, the study of Prehistoric periods, explains the lifestyles of prehistoric civilizations through research into their fossilized remains and the artifacts that they made.
The Neolithic era emerged gradually between 2500 BC and 1500 BC when the vast number of people emigrated from the Asian mainland to the Malaysian peninsula, then to the island of Indonesia by sea. The immigrants built dwellings, planted rice on dry land or in irrigated fields and raised cattle. They formed agrarian village communities. This settled lifestyle enabled men to develop their skills in many areas, thus establishing a specific Neolithic culture, examples of which can be seen in this room.
Treasure Room
The Treasure Rooms are divided into two sections - the Archaeology Room and the Ethnography Room. There are about 2,00 items in the Museum's gold and silver collections, the majority of which were found accidentally rather than on organized digs.
Indonesia has been rich in gold and other precious metals for centuries. Artifacts were made using such processes as casting, soldering, riveting an sewing with gold wire, and were decorated by chiseling, the repousse technique (whereby the design is hammered from the inside of an object), and by adding detailed ornamentation.
Due to the biodegradability of the most materials used by the ancient Indonesian kingdoms, relatively little remains for scholars to base their study of these civilizations upon. As a result, since gold does not deteriorate, these objects are treasured not just for their value and decoration but also for their great historical importance. As well as a high level of culture, the gold items reveal a great deal about the life and rituals of the early kingdoms.
In 1990, farmers found a cache of treasure from java's classical Era ( 5th-15th century ) in Wonoboyo, Klaten, Central Java. These exquisite gold and silver items, collectively weighing more than 35 kg, are believed to have been buried in Lava in the early10th century, perhaps due to a major eruption of Mount Merapi. They comprise the largest find in Indonesia this century and are currently displayed in the showcase in the center of the Archaeology treasure room.
The collection in the Ethnography treasure room comprises objects from the 18th to the early 20th centuries. The artifacts are mostly crafted from 14-24 carat gold and many are adorned with precious stones.
Bronze Collection
Bronze is well-represented in the Museum and the collection, which comprises up to 3,199 pieces, is absolutely spectacular.
The Bronze Age in Indonesia is estimated as having begun around the st century BC, and it drastically changed man's way of life both practically and culturally. Bronze is a mixture of copper and tin, and as it has a low melting point, objects were either produced by forging (heating then beating the bronze) or by wax-casting techniques. Bronze axes, ceremonial items and jewelry were the most popular items made.
With the onset of the Classical Age production and casting processes improved, and techniques such as soldering were introduced. Bronze items became more varied, ranging from statues of Buddha for worship to domestic appliances, and their decoration more ornate. Bronze was also used to replace materials that were easily damaged, so the shape of domestic appliances, for example, did not radically change - a water jar would look the same in bronze as it did in terra cotta.
Stone Sculptures
Stone tools and statues have been made by Indonesian civilizations since prehistoric times. The gradual sophistication of these objects and tools used to create them are indicative of cultural progress.The Museum Nasional has a wealth of stone statues in many different forms and sizes, most notably relating to ancestral worship, Hindu gods and goddesses, kings and animals. The statues were usually put in temple alcoves or in the temple's main room (cellar), and the majority of them were discovered in Central Java and Sumatra. Volcanic andesite was most commonly used but many of the East Javanese statues made during the 14th and 15th centuries, were sculpted from sandstone or limestone. As a result of the Hindu-Buddhist influence that was prevalent in Indonesia between the 4th and the 10th centuries, statues created during this period were very similar to those made in East India. Sculptors (silpin). In India had to follow precise rules stated in the Silpasastra book; for example, eyes had to be shaped like lotus (padma) leaves, eyebrows like an archer's bow and arms like an elephants trunk. While these features were copied in Indonesia, the Silpasastra rules were generally not strictly adhered to, and after this period, especially during the Majapahit era (14th and 15th centuries ), statues made throughout the archipelago exuded a more 'Indonesian' style. In the Museum Nasional, Stone Sculpture Collections is included into the Archaeology Section.
Ceramic collection
The ceramics collection differentiates between artifacts originating from countries such as China, Vietnam, Thailand, Myanmar and Japan, and objects made in Indonesia or made in Indonesia or made out of terra cotta. This particular collection gives us a good insight into Indonesia's maritime trade over the countries.
Research indicates that the Chinese sailed to India via Indonesia as early as the Western Han period (205 BC to 220 AD) and that firm trade relation were subsequently established.
The islands of Indonesia were the source of many rare commodities and foreign trades were motivated to undertake long and risky sea voyages to get there. Many ships sank before reaching their journey's and, however.
Their non-perishable cargoes, such as ceramics, which would have been used as barter, were washed ashore. Some items were used as common household utensils but fine ceramics were more rare and much sought after. They become cherished heirlooms and were used during the specials ceremonies for birth, circumcision, marriage and death. Occasionally, they were specially commissioned for a private buyer or given as tributes to local dignitaries.
The nucleus of the Museum Nasional's foreign ceramic collection was donated by the Dutch philanthropist and collector, Egbert Willem van Orsoy de Flines, who also became the first ceramics curator of the Museum in 1959.
Although originating in other countries, the ceramics objects in the Museum collection were all found in Indonesia. As well being objects of great beauty, they form an important part of the nation's history. The Museum National is located on the side of Merdeka Square or Lapangan Merdeka and was built in 1862 at that time Dutch colonial administration realized about the great treasure of Indonesian cultural heritages and long history of Indonesia. The biggest surprised for the Western historians was the fact that historical record in Indonesia showing tremendous level of similarities with those in India, India and Asia mainland in general. The elements of India is the most interesting aspect at one side and the fact of Indonesian ethnography. All these facts had invited various experts to study Indonesia in more intensive and extensive effort. In the field of history the archaeologists, paleontologists, epigraphists, linguistic, paleographic and ceramologists have dedicated themselves for the light of Indonesian history, educated local student to understand their culture which had been a great historians such as Prof. Dr. Poerbatjaraka, Prof. Wiryosuparto, Prof Soekarto, Prof. Soekmono, Prof. I.B. Mantra and many others. In the field of Anthropology even more expert were born, although it is much later such as Prof. Koentjaraningrat.

Deeper study on Hindu tradition has brought into light the great influence of Indian Epic such as Mahabharata and Ramayana in the life of Javanese and Balinese. Everywhere in the region of Indonesia were found the remains of ancient Hindu kingdoms and culture. The remains either in thee form of monuments and artifacts. This fact has encouraged the establishment of national museum as the center for Indonesian cultural study.

As a national museum, their collection consist of ethnic map, Indonesian relief map, various ethnic cultural objects from cloths, music, house model, and relics. In the field of history, a big number of collection from ancient Hindu kingdoms, and Chinese ceramic from Hand dynasty ( ca. 300 to 220 AD.

History Of National Museum
On April 24, 1778, a group of Dutch intellectuals established a scientific institution under the name Bataviaasch Genotschap van Kunsten en Wetenschappen, (Batavia Society for Arts and Science). This private body had the aim of promoting research in the field of arts and sciences, especially in history, archaeology, ethnography and physics, and publish the various findings.
One of the founders - JCM Radermacher - donated a building and a collection of cultural objects and books, which were of great value to start off a museum and library for the society. Due to the growing collections, General Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles built a new premises on Jalan Majapahit No. 3 at the beginning of the 19th century and named it the Literary Society. In the 1862 the Dutch East Indian government decided to build a new museum that would not only serve as an office but also could be used to house, preserve and display the collections.
The Museum was officially opened in 1868 and became known as Gedung Gajah (Elephant House) or Gedung Arca (House of Statues). It was called Gedung Gajah on account of the bronze elephant statue in the front yard donated by King Chulalongkorn from Thailand in 1871. It was also called Gedung Arca because a great variety of statues from different periods are on display in the house.
On February 29, 1950 the Institution became the Lembaga Kebudayaan Indonesia (Indonesian Culture Council) and on September 17, 1962 it was handed over to the Indonesian government and became the Museum Pusat (Central Museum). By decree of the Minister of Education and Culture No. 092/0/1979 of May 28, 1979 it was renamed the Museum Nasional. The Museum Nasional is not only a centre for research and study into the national and cultural heritage, but also functions as an educative, cultural and recreational information centre.
Currently the Musium Nasional houses collections of 109,342 objects under the categories of prehistory, archaeology, ethnography, numismatics-heraldic, geography and historical relics.
In 1994, the museum started with is expansion project. The new building, constructed in the same architectural style as the old, comprises an arena for theatrical performances and more spaces for exhibitions. The building is scheduled for completion this year.

General Information
Opening Times
The Museum Nasional is open from 8.30 am to 2.30 pm on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Sunday; from 8.30 am to 11.30 am on Friday; and from 8.30 am to 1.30 pm on Saturday.
The Museum is closed on Monday.
Admission Fee
Adults - Rp750
Children under 17 years and students - Rp250
Gift shop
A small gift shop located in the entrance hall has the same opening hours as the rest of The Museum. It offers a selection of books, postcards and reproductions of various exhibits.
Parking
The Museum is situated at jalan Merdeka Barat. The front courtyard can accommodate cars and tour buses.
Tours
The Indonesian Heritage Society conducts tours of the Museum at the following times
English: Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday 9.30 am & LAST SUNDAY of every month at 10.30 am
Japanese: Tuesday 10 am and FIRST SUNDAY of every month at 10 am
German: Thursday 10 am
The times and dates of guided tours in Dutch and French can be obtained by telephoning the Indonesian Heritage Society Office at Museum Nasional on (62-21) 381 1551 extension 46
Visitors are kindly asked to refrain from smoking, eating and drinking in all areas of the Museum, and are prohibited from touching the exhibits.

COLLECTION
Prehistory
The Prehistoric Age has long time frame, beginning from the presence of man until the emergence of writing differs in every part of the world. From the discovery of ancient human fossils in Indonesia, it is estimated that man lived here around one million years ago. Writing emerged before the 4th century.
Paleontology, the study of Prehistoric periods, explains the lifestyles of prehistoric civilizations through research into their fossilized remains and the artifacts that they made.
The Neolithic era emerged gradually between 2500 BC and 1500 BC when the vast number of people emigrated from the Asian mainland to the Malaysian peninsula, then to the island of Indonesia by sea. The immigrants built dwellings, planted rice on dry land or in irrigated fields and raised cattle. They formed agrarian village communities. This settled lifestyle enabled men to develop their skills in many areas, thus establishing a specific Neolithic culture, examples of which can be seen in this room.
Treasure Room
The Treasure Rooms are divided into two sections - the Archaeology Room and the Ethnography Room. There are about 2,00 items in the Museum's gold and silver collections, the majority of which were found accidentally rather than on organized digs.
Indonesia has been rich in gold and other precious metals for centuries. Artifacts were made using such processes as casting, soldering, riveting an sewing with gold wire, and were decorated by chiseling, the repousse technique (whereby the design is hammered from the inside of an object), and by adding detailed ornamentation.
Due to the biodegradability of the most materials used by the ancient Indonesian kingdoms, relatively little remains for scholars to base their study of these civilizations upon. As a result, since gold does not deteriorate, these objects are treasured not just for their value and decoration but also for their great historical importance. As well as a high level of culture, the gold items reveal a great deal about the life and rituals of the early kingdoms.
In 1990, farmers found a cache of treasure from java's classical Era ( 5th-15th century ) in Wonoboyo, Klaten, Central Java. These exquisite gold and silver items, collectively weighing more than 35 kg, are believed to have been buried in Lava in the early10th century, perhaps due to a major eruption of Mount Merapi. They comprise the largest find in Indonesia this century and are currently displayed in the showcase in the center of the Archaeology treasure room.
The collection in the Ethnography treasure room comprises objects from the 18th to the early 20th centuries. The artifacts are mostly crafted from 14-24 carat gold and many are adorned with precious stones.
Bronze Collection
Bronze is well-represented in the Museum and the collection, which comprises up to 3,199 pieces, is absolutely spectacular.
The Bronze Age in Indonesia is estimated as having begun around the 1st century BC, and it drastically changed man's way of life both practically and culturally. Bronze is a mixture of copper and tin, and as it has a low melting point, objects were either produced by forging (heating then beating the bronze) or by wax-casting techniques. Bronze axes, ceremonial items and jewelry were the most popular items made.
With the onset of the Classical Age production and casting processes improved, and techniques such as soldering were introduced. Bronze items became more varied, ranging from statues of Buddha for worship to domestic appliances, and their decoration more ornate. Bronze was also used to replace materials that were easily damaged, so the shape of domestic appliances, for example, did not radically change - a water jar would look the same in bronze as it did in terra cotta.
Stone Sculptures
Stone tools and statues have been made by Indonesian civilizations since prehistoric times. The gradual sophistication of these objects and tools used to create them are indicative of cultural progress.The Museum Nasional has a wealth of stone statues in many different forms and sizes, most notably relating to ancestral worship, Hindu gods and goddesses, kings and animals. The statues were usually put in temple alcoves or in the temple's main room (cellar), and the majority of them were discovered in Central Java and Sumatra. Volcanic andesite was most commonly used but many of the East Javanese statues made during the 14th and 15th centuries, were sculpted from sandstone or limestone.As a result of the Hindu-Buddhist influence that was prevalent in Indonesia between the 4th and the 10th centuries, statues created during this period were very similar to those made in East India. Sculptors (silpin). In India had to follow precise rules stated in the Silpasastra book; for example, eyes had to be shaped like lotus (padma) leaves, eyebrows like an archer's bow and arms like an elephants trunk. While these features were copied in Indonesia, the Silpasastra rules were generally not strictly adhered to, and after this period, especially during the Majapahit era (14th and 15th centuries ), statues made throughout the archipelago exuded a more 'Indonesian' style. In the Museum Nasional, Stone Sculpture Collections is included into the Archaeology Section.
Ceramic collection
The ceramics collection differentiates between artifacts originating from countries such as China, Vietnam, Thailand, Myanmar and Japan, and objects made in Indonesia or made in Indonesia or made out of terra cotta. This particular collection gives us a good insight into Indonesia's maritime trade over the countries.
Research indicates that the Chinese sailed to India via Indonesia as early as the Western Han period (205 BC to 220 AD) and that firm trade relation were subsequently established.
The islands of Indonesia were the source of many rare commodities and foreign trades were motivated to undertake long and risky sea voyages to get there. Many ships sank before reaching their journey's and, however.
Their non-perishable cargoes, such as ceramics, which would have been used as barter, were washed ashore. Some items were used as common household utensils but fine ceramics were more rare and much sought after. They become cherished heirlooms and were used during the specials ceremonies for birth, circumcision, marriage and death. Occasionally, they were specially commissioned for a private buyer or given as tributes to local dignitaries.
The nucleus of the Museum Nasional's foreign ceramic collection was donated by the Dutch philanthropist and collector, Egbert Willem van Orsoy de Flines, who also became the first ceramics curator of the Museum in 1959.
Although originating in other countries, the ceramics objects in the Museum collection were all found in Indonesia. As well being objects of great beauty, they form an important part of the nation's history. The Museum National is located on the side of Merdeka Square or Lapangan Merdeka and was built in 1862 at that time Dutch colonial administration realized about the great treasure of Indonesian cultural heritages and long history of Indonesia. The biggest surprised for the Western historians was the fact that historical record in Indonesia showing tremendous level of similarities with those in India, India and Asia mainland in general. The elements of India is the most interesting aspect at one side and the fact of Indonesian ethnography. All these facts had invited various experts to study Indonesia in more intensive and extensive effort. In the field of history the archaeologists, paleontologists, epigraphists, linguistic, paleographic and ceramologists have dedicated themselves for the light of Indonesian history, educated local student to understand their culture which had been a great historians such as Prof. Dr. Poerbatjaraka, Prof. Wiryosuparto, Prof Soekarto, Prof. Soekmono, Prof. I.B. Mantra and many others. In the field of Anthropology even more expert were born, although it is much later such as Prof. Koentjaraningrat.

Deeper study on Hindu tradition has brought into light the great influence of Indian Epic such as Mahabharata and Ramayana in the life of Javanese and Balinese. Everywhere in the region of Indonesia were found the remains of ancient Hindu kingdoms and culture. The remains either in thee form of monuments and artifacts. This fact has encouraged the establishment of national museum as the center for Indonesian cultural study.

As a national museum, their collection consist of ethnic map, Indonesian relief map, various ethnic cultural objects from cloths, music, house model, and relics. In the field of history, a big number of collection from ancient Hindu kingdoms, and Chinese ceramic from Hand dynasty ( ca. 300 to 220 AD.

History Of National Museum
On April 24, 1778, a group of Dutch intellectuals established a scientific institution under the name Bataviaasch Genotschap van Kunsten en Wetenschappen, (Batavia Society for Arts and Science). This private body had the aim of promoting research in the field of arts and sciences, especially in history, archaeology, ethnography and physics, and publish the various findings.
One of the founders - JCM Radermacher - donated a building and a collection of cultural objects and books, which were of great value to start off a museum and library for the society. Due to the growing collections, General Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles built a new premises on Jalan Majapahit No. 3 at the beginning of the 19th century and named it the Literary Society. In the 1862 the Dutch East Indian government decided to build a new museum that would not only serve as an office but also could be used to house, preserve and display the collections.
The Museum was officially opened in 1868 and became known as Gedung Gajah (Elephant House) or Gedung Arca (House of Statues). It was called Gedung Gajah on account of the bronze elephant statue in the front yard donated by King Chulalongkorn from Thailand in 1871. It was also called Gedung Arca because a great variety of statues from different periods are on display in the house.
On February 29, 1950 the Institution became the Lembaga Kebudayaan Indonesia (Indonesian Culture Council) and on September 17, 1962 it was handed over to the Indonesian government and became the Museum Pusat (Central Museum). By decree of the Minister of Education and Culture No. 092/0/1979 of May 28, 1979 it was renamed the Museum Nasional. The Museum Nasional is not only a centre for research and study into the national and cultural heritage, but also functions as an educative, cultural and recreational information centre.
Currently the Musium Nasional houses collections of 109,342 objects under the categories of prehistory, archaeology, ethnography, numismatics-heraldic, geography and historical relics.
In 1994, the museum started with is expansion project. The new building, constructed in the same architectural style as the old, comprises an arena for theatrical performances and more spaces for exhibitions. The building is scheduled for completion this year.

General Information
Opening Times
The Musium Nasional is open from 8.30 am to 2.30 pm on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Sunday; from 8.30 am to 11.30 am on Friday; and from 8.30 am to 1.30 pm on Saturday.
The Museum is closed on Monday.
Admission Fee
Adults - Rp750
Children under 17 years and students - Rp250
Gift shop
A small gift shop located in the entrance hall has the same opening hours as the rest of The Museum. It offers a selection of books, postcards and reproductions of various exhibits.
Parking
The Museum is situated on jalan Merdeka Barat. The front courtyard can accommodate cars and tour buses.
Tours
The Indonesian Heritage Society conducts tours of the Museum at the following times
English: Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday 9.30 am & LAST SUNDAY of every month at 10.30 am
Japanese: Tuesday 10 am and FIRST SUNDAY of every month at 10 am
German: Thursday 10 am
The times and dates of guided tours in Dutch and French can be obtained by telephoning the Indonesian Heritage Society Office at Musium Nasional on (62-21) 381 1551 extension 46
Visitors are kindly asked to refrain from smoking, eating and drinking in all areas of the Museum, and are prohibited from touching the exhibits.

COLLECTION
Prehistory
The Prehistoric Age has long time frame, beginning from the presence of man until the emergence of writing differs in every part of the world. From the discovery of ancient human fossils in Indonesia, it is estimated that man lived here around one million years ago. Writing emerged before the 4th century.
Paleontology, the study of Prehistoric periods, explains the lifestyles of prehistoric civilizations through research into their fossilized remains and the artefacts that they made.
The Neolithic era emerged gradually between 2500 BC and 1500 BC when the vast number of people emigrated from the Asian mainland to the Malaysian peninsula, then to the island of Indonesia by sea. The immigrants built dwellings, planted rice on dry land or in irrigated fields and raised cattle. They formed agrarian village communities. This settled lifestyle enabled men to develop their skills in many areas, thus establishing a specific Neolithic culture, examples of which can be seen in this room.
Treasure Room
The Treasure Rooms are divided into two sections - the Archaeology Room and the Ethnography Room. There are about 2,00 items in the Museum's gold and silver collections, the majority of which were found accidentally rather than on organized digs.
Indonesia has been rich in gold and other precious metals for centuries. Artefacts were made using such processes as casting, soldering, riveting an sewing with gold wire, and were decorated by chiselling, the repousse technique (whereby the design is hammered from the inside of an object), and by adding detailed ornamentation.
Due to the biodegradability of the most materials used by the ancient Indonesian kingdoms, relatively little remains for scholars to base their study of these civilizations upon. As a result, since gold does not deteriorate, these objects are treasured not just for their value and decoration but also for their great historical importance. As well as a high level of culture, the gold items reveal a great deal about the life and rituals of the early kingdoms.
In 1990, farmers found a cache of treasure from java's classical Era ( 5th -15th century ) in Wonoboyo, Klaten, Central Java. These exquisite gold and silver items, collectively weighing more than 35 kg, are believed to have been buried in Lava in the early10th century, perhaps due to a major eruption of Mount Merapi. They comprise the largest find in Indonesia this century and are currently displayed in the showcase in the center of the Archaeology treasure room.
The collection in the Ethnography treasure room comprises objects from the 18th to the early 20th centuries. The artefacts are mostly crafted from 14-24 carat gold and many are adorned with precious stones.
Bronze Collection
Bronze is well-represented in the Museum and the collection, which comprises up to 3,199 pieces, is absolutely spectacular.
The Bronze Age in Indonesia is estimated as having begun around the 1st century BC, and it drastically changed man's way of life both practically and culturally. Bronze is a mixture of copper and tin, and as it has a low melting point, objects were either produced by forging (heating then beating the bronze) or by wax-casting techniques. Bronze axes, ceremonial items and jewellery were the most popular items made.
With the onset of the Classical Age production and casting processes improved, and techniques such as soldering were introduced. Bronze items became more varied, ranging from statues of Buddha for worship to domestic appliances, and their decoration more ornate. Bronze was also used to replace materials that were easily damaged, so the shape of domestic appliances, for example, did not radically change - a water jar would look the same in bronze as it did in terracotta.
Stone Sculptures
Stone tools and statues have been made by Indonesian civilizations since prehistoric times. The gradual sophistication of these objects and tools used to create them are indicative of cultural progress.The Museum Nasional has a wealth of stone statues in many different forms and sizes, most notably relating to ancestral worship, Hindu gods and goddesses, kings and animals. The statues were usually put in temple alcoves or in the temple's main room (cella), and the majority of them were discovered in Central Java and Sumatra. Volcanic andesite was most commonly used but many of the East Javanese statues made during the 14th and 15th centuries, were sculpted from sandstone or limestone.As a result of the Hindu-Buddhist influence that was prevalent in Indonesia between the 4th and the 10th centuries, statues created during this period were very similar to those made in East India. Sculptors (silpin). In India had to follow precise rules stated in the Silpasastra book; for example, eyes had to be shaped like lotus (padma) leaves, eyebrows like an archer's bow and arms like an elephants trunk. While these features were copied in Indonesia, the Silpasastra rules were generally not strictly adhered to, and after this period, especially during the Majapahit era (14th and 15th centuries ), statues made throughout the archipelago exuded a more 'Indonesian' style. In the Museum Nasional, Stone Sculpture Collections is included into the Archaeology Section.
Ceramic collection
The ceramics collection differentiates between artefacts originating from countries such as China, Vietnam, Thailand, Myanmar and Japan, and objects made in Indonesia or made in Indonesia or made out of terracotta. This particular collection gives us a good insight into Indonesia's maritime trade over the countries.
Research indicates that the Chinese sailed to India via Indonesia as early as the Western Han period (205 BC to 220 AD) and that firm trade relation were subsequently established.
The islands of Indonesia were the source of many rare commodities and foreign trades were motivated to undertake long and risky sea voyages to get there. Many ships sank before reaching their journey's and, however.
Their non-perishable cargoes, such as ceramics, which would have been used as barter, were washed ashore. Some items were used as common household utensils but fine ceramics were more rare and much sought after. They become cherished heirlooms and were used during the specials ceremonies or birth, circumcision, marriage and death. Occasionally, they were specially commissioned for a private buyer or given as tributes to local dignitaries.
The nucleus of the Museum Nasional's foreign ceramic collection was donated by the Dutch philanthropist and collector, Egbert Willem van Orsoy de Flines,who also became the first ceramics curator of the Museum in 1959.
Although riginating in other countries, the ceramics objects in the Museum collection were all found in Indonesia. As well being objects of great beauty, they form an important part of the nation's history.






CHOICE OF HOTELS
Alia Pasar Baru Hotel
Alma Hotel
Atlantic Hotel
Batavia Hotel
Grand Cempaka Hotel
Golden Boutique Hotel
Jatra Hotel
Nam Center Hotel
Paragon Hotel
Patra Hotel
Sanno Hotel
Sofyan Betawi Hotel
Sofyan Tebet Hotel
Traveller Hotel
Triniti Hotel
Peta Kota Jakarta


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The People
Interesting Places
History of Jakarta
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National Museum One of the biggest and most complete exhibition of human history from prehistory up to the classical period. This museum is the most frequented place by students and reserachers. Indonesia presents rich human historical facts which can be used to reconstruct the culture of south east asia and even further to the influence giving countries such as China, India and Arabia.
National Monument is a tower more then 100 meters in the center of Jakarta city as the mark of Indonesian independence and the appointment of Jakarta as the capital city of Indonesia. One can ascend up the tower and watch the city's beautiful panorama.
The Pekan Raya Jakarta known as Jakarta Fair or Jakarta International Expo is one of the biggest fair ground in South East Asia built to boost the business life of Indonesia and regionally the countries of south east Asia. The organization of exhibition is held regularly for various line of products from traditional to modern hi-tec products that can be produced at the decades. The location of the Jakarta International Expo as the regular place of Jakarta Fair orPekan Raya Jakarta is at South Jakarta near
Taman Mini Indonesia Indah or in English is Beautiful Indonesia in Miniature, located on south east of Jakarta. This park is one of the mark of the city offering selected arts from all over Indonesian regions from architecture, dances, and musics and culinary. Some of them offer daily cultural attractions to the visitors during certain hours. Special modern recreations are also available and is very cheering for the chldren.
Tanjung Priok Sea Port Tanjung Priok is one of the biggest seaport in Indonesia belong to Jakarta Spceial Province. Among the biggest sea port of Indonesia developped since 17th century are Tanjung Perak - Surabaya, Belawan - North Sumatra, and Soekarno - Hatta Sea port in Makassar, south Sulawesi. The traffic of goods from various areas of Indonesia are concentrated at those 3 ports to be forwarded to outside Indonesia, and as on entry.
Jakarta Convention Center Jakarta Convention Center is one of Jakartas land mark on conference, exhibition and meeting business with international standard. Located at Jalan Gatot Subroto in the center of Jakarta city, quipped with the latest audio visual for the full function of business promotion and transaction. Some short information on Jakarta Convention Center are available, see list of interesting places